Diagnosis

Simple fractures of the mandibular body

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 Imaging
 Sagittal split fracture
 Mechanism of the injury
Imaging
Simple fracture of the mandibular body

Routine diagnosis of this type of fracture should include x-rays taken in two planes at 90° to each other; the minimum requirement is a PA view and a panoramic view.
CT or digital volume tomography (DVT) imaging may be an alternative. The coronal, sagittal and axial planes each must be checked for the occurrence of fractures.
In order to have a clear overview, a 3-D image is optimal.


Simple fracture of the mandibular body

3-D reconstruction showing a bilateral mandibular fracture:
anterior body fracture on the right and angle fracture on the left.


Simple fracture of the mandibular body

Representative slice of a sagittal CT scan series of the same patient.


Simple fracture of the mandibular body

OPT shows the same patient with bilateral fractures.


Simple fracture of the mandibular body

DVT (digital volume tomography or cone-beam technology) allows for 3-D analysis and reconstruction on the basis of one data set and carries a radiation dose 1/5 of CT scanning.


Sagittal split fracture
Simple fracture of the mandibular body

Sagittal fracture lines can be best defined using imaging in tomographic or three dimensional techniques.Sagittal fracture lines can be best defined using imaging in tomographic or three dimensional techniques.


Simple fracture of the mandibular body

Different view of same fracture. Sagittal condition not obvious.


Simple fracture of the mandibular body

Axial CT view.


Mechanism of the injury
Simple fracture of the mandibular body

Simple body fractures most often result from direct impact during physical altercation. Fractures of the mandibular body rarely occur in isolation in the dentate mandible.

The frequency of midbody fractures is rare in comparison to anterior body and posterior body fractures. The latter two locations represent points of weakness due the biomechanics of the mandible. In the anterior body the tooth roots of the canine and the premolars are responsible for decreased mandibular stability. In the posterior body the lever relations close to the angle make up for the weakness.

They are usually combined with fractures in the contralateral hemimandible or with ipsilateral fractures in the ramus/subcondyle.

In contrast, in the edentulous atrophic mandible the body is the most frequent fracture site either unilaterally or bilaterally.