Executive Editor: Peter Trafton

Authors: Martin Jaeger, Frankie Leung, Wilson Li

Proximal humerus 11-C1.3 Open reduction; plate fixation

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Glossary

1 Principles top

Proper reduction

Proper reduction of the humeral head fragment is key. This may require an glenohumeral arthrotomy, via either an osteotomy of the lesser tuberosity or tenotomy of the subscapularis tendon, to improve visualization and manipulation.


Standard plates provide an alternative option, for example the modified cloverleaf plate (B). enlarge

Angular stable versus standard plates

This procedure describes proximal humeral fracture fixation with an angular stable plate (A). Sometimes, these implants are not available. Standard plates provide an alternative option, for example the modified cloverleaf plate (B). Presently, the specific indications, advantages, and disadvantages of angular stable and standard plates are being clarified. There is some evidence that angular stable plate provide better outcomes. In addition to type and technique of fixation, the quality of reduction, the soft-tissue handling, and the characteristics of the injury and patient significantly influence the results. There is no evidence that the use of angular stable plates will overcome these other factors.

2 Reduction and preliminary fixation top

Reduction of the humeral head may be possible with digital pressure without open exposure. enlarge

Reduction of the humeral head

Reduction of the humeral head may be possible with digital pressure without open exposure. If this is unsuccessful, one could use a periosteal elevator or a bone hook inserted into the glenohumeral joint through a small incision of the rotator cuff.

Prolonged attempts at closed reduction are not encouraged. Proceed with open reduction through an anterior shoulder arthrotomy. Click here for a description.

One or two threaded pins in the humeral head may be used as “joy-sticks”, to aid the reduction.


Secure the reduced humeral head temporarily using 2 or 3 K-wires. As shown, they are placed from distal to proximal. enlarge

Fix the humeral head temporarily

Secure the reduced humeral head temporarily using 2 or 3 K-wires. As shown, they are placed from distal to proximal.

Make sure that they are anterior enough to avoid interfering with the plate application.


Be sure that there is no anteversion or excessive retroversion of the humeral head. enlarge

Check the position of the humeral head in the axial/lateral view and be sure that there is no anteversion or excessive retroversion of the humeral head.

Remember that the C-arm should be placed so that AP and axial views can both be obtained by C-arm repositioning without motion of the patient’s arm.

3 Plate fixation top

Attach the plate to the humeral shaft with a bicortical small fragment 3.5 mm screw inserted through the elongated hole. enlarge

Attach plate to humeral shaft

Attach the plate to the humeral shaft with a bicortical small fragment 3.5 mm screw inserted through the elongated hole.

Pearl 1: fine tuning of plate position
If the first screw is inserted only loosely in the center of the elongated hole, fine-tuning of the plate position is still possible. With the plate in proper position, tighten this screw securely.


Correct plate position enlarge

Correct plate position
The correct plate position is:

  1. about 5-8 mm distal to the top of the greater tuberosity
  2. aligned properly along the axis of the humeral shaft
  3. slightly posterior to the bicipital grove (2-4 mm)

To confirm a correct axial plate position insert a K-wire through the proximal hole of the insertion guide. enlarge

Confirmation of correct plate position
The correct plate position can be checked by palpation of its relationship to the bony structures and also confirmed by image intensification.

To confirm a correct axial plate position insert a K-wire through the proximal hole of the insertion guide. The K-wire should rest on the top of the humeral head.


Pitfall: plate too close to the bicipital groove enlarge

Pitfall 1: plate too close to the bicipital groove
The bicipital tendon and the ascending branch of the anterior humeral circumflex artery are at risk if the plate is positioned too close to the bicipital groove. (The illustration shows the plate in correct position, posterior to the bicipital groove).


Pitfall: plate too proximal enlarge

Pitfall 2: plate too proximal
A plate positioned too proximal carries two risks:

  1. The plate can impinge the acromion
  2. The most proximal screws might penetrate or fail to securely engage the humeral head

Remember that with an anatomical neck fracture, the humeral head fragment is small. Proper plate position is critical for optimal screw placement.


Preliminary plate fixation with K-wires enlarge

Pearl 2: preliminary plate fixation with K-wires
For x-ray confirmation of plate position, one can fix the plate preliminarily to the bone with several 1.4 mm K-wires inserted through the small plate holes, before placing any screws.


Alternative provisional plate fixation: K-wires inserted through their appropriate K-wire sleeves. enlarge

Pearl 3: insert K-wires through appropriate guiding sleeves.


Use an appropriate sleeve to drill holes for the humeral head screws. enlarge

Fix plate to the humeral head

Drill holes
Use an appropriate sleeve to drill holes for the humeral head screws. Do not drill through the subchondral bone and into the shoulder joint.


Woodpecker”-drilling technique enlarge

Avoiding intraarticular screw placement
Screws that penetrate the humeral head may significantly damage the glenoid cartilage. Primary penetration occurs when the screws are initially placed. Secondary penetration is the result of subsequent fracture collapse. Drilling into the joint increases the risk of screws becoming intraarticular.

Two drilling techniques help to avoid drilling into the joint.

Pearl 1: “Woodpecker”-drilling technique (as illustrated)
In the woodpecker-drilling technique, advance the drill bit only for a short distance, then pull the drill back before advancing again. Keep repeating this procedure until subchondral bone contact can be felt. Take great care to avoid penetration of the humeral head.

Pearl 2: Drilling near cortex only
Particular in osteoporotic bone, one can drill only through the near cortex. Push the depth gauge through the remaining bone until subchondral resistance is felt.


Determine screw length enlarge

Determine screw length
The intact subchondral bone should be felt with a depth gauge or blunt pin to ensure that the screw stays within the humeral head. The integrity of the subchondral bone can be confirmed by palpation or the sound of the instrument tapping against it. Typically, choose a screw slightly shorter than the measured length.


Insert a locking-head screw through the screw sleeve into the humeral head. enlarge

Insert screw
Insert a locking-head screw through the screw sleeve into the humeral head. The sleeve aims the screw correctly. Particularly in osteoporotic bone, a screw may not follow the hole that has been drilled.


Place a sufficient number of screws (often 5) into the humeral head. enlarge

Number of screws and location
Place a sufficient number of screws (often 5) into the humeral head. The optimal number and location of screws has not been determined. Bone quality and fracture morphology should be considered. In osteoporotic bone a higher number of screws may be required.


Insert one or two additional bicortical screws into the humeral shaft. enlarge

Insert additional screws into the humeral shaft

Insert one or two additional bicortical screws into the humeral shaft.

Any K-wires placed during the procedure may now be removed.

4 Use of standard plates top

If no angular stable plate is available, a standard plate provides an alternative. The described procedure (reduction, ... enlarge

If no angular stable plate is available, a standard plate provides an alternative. The described procedure (reduction, preliminary fixation, and rotator cuff sutures) is essentially the same for standard plates, except for the screws. A good choice from the standard plates is the small fragment cloverleaf plate, with its tip cut off, and contoured as necessary. This plate allows multiple small fragment screws for the humeral head.

Be aware that angular stable implants provide better fixation, especially in osteoporotic bone. On the other hand, even angular stable plates are not a substitute for good surgical technique and judgment. Advances in fracture classification, understanding of the blood supply, use of rotator cuff tendon sutures, anatomical fracture reduction, and provisional fixation, represent improvements in care. When combined with optimal implants, these contributions offer the best chance of a good outcome.

5 Final check of osteosynthesis top

Carefully check for correct reduction and fixation (including proper implant position and length) at various arm positions. enlarge

Using image intensification, carefully check for correct reduction and fixation (including proper implant position and length) at various arm positions. Ensure that screw tips are not intraarticular.


Also obtain an axial view. enlarge

Also obtain an axial view.

v2.0 2011-05-02